ᴡᴇ ᴀʟʟ ʜᴀᴠᴇ sɪᴍᴘʟᴇ ᴍᴏᴍᴇɴᴛs ᴛʜᴀᴛ ᴍᴀᴋᴇ ᴜs sᴍɪʟᴇ ᴇᴠᴇʀʏ ᴅᴀʏ. ɪᴛ ᴄᴏᴜʟᴅ ʙᴇ sᴏᴍᴇᴛʜɪɴɢ ᴀs sɪᴍᴘʟᴇ ᴀs ʜᴀᴠɪɴɢ ᴀ ᴅᴇʟɪᴄɪᴏᴜs ᴍᴇᴀʟ, ʙᴇɪɴɢ ᴀʙʟᴇ ᴛᴏ sʜᴀʀᴇ ᴀ ᴘʜᴏɴᴇ ᴄᴏɴᴠᴇʀsᴀᴛɪᴏɴ ᴡɪᴛʜ ᴀɴ ᴏʟᴅ ғʀɪᴇɴᴅ ᴏʀ sɪᴍᴘʟʏ ʙᴇɪɴɢ ɢʀᴇᴇᴛᴇᴅ ᴡɪᴛʜ ᴀɴᴏᴛʜᴇʀ sᴍɪʟᴇ ɪɴ ᴛʜᴇ sᴛʀᴇᴇᴛ. ᴀ sᴍɪʟᴇ ᴄᴀɴ ᴛᴜʀɴ ʏᴏᴜʀ ᴅᴀʏ ᴀʀᴏᴜɴᴅ ᴄᴏᴍᴘʟᴇᴛᴇʟʏ, ɪᴛ ᴄᴀɴ ᴍᴀᴋᴇ ᴀ sᴀᴅ ᴅᴀʏ ᴀ ʜᴀᴘᴘʏ ᴏɴᴇ, ᴀɴᴅ ʙᴇsᴛ ᴏғ ᴀʟʟ, ɪᴛ’s ᴀʟᴡᴀʏs ғʀᴇᴇ.ᴍɪʟʟɪᴏɴ sᴍɪʟᴇs ɪs ᴀ ᴄᴀᴍᴘᴀɪɢɴ ᴛᴏ sʜᴀʀᴇ ᴛʜᴏsᴇ sɪᴍᴘʟᴇ, ᴇᴠᴇʀʏᴅᴀʏ ᴍᴏᴍᴇɴᴛs ᴏғ ʜᴀᴘᴘɪɴᴇss ᴀɴᴅ ᴊᴏʏ. ᴀ ᴄᴀᴍᴘᴀɪɢɴ ᴛᴏ sʜᴀʀᴇ ᴀ ᴍɪʟʟɪᴏɴ sᴍɪʟᴇs ᴀɴᴅ ᴘᴏsɪᴛɪᴠᴇ sᴛᴏʀɪᴇs ғʀᴏᴍ ᴘᴇᴏᴘʟᴇ ᴀʀᴏᴜɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇ ᴡᴏʀʟᴅ. ɪᴛ ɪs ᴀɴ ᴏᴘᴇɴ ғᴀᴄᴇʙᴏᴏᴋ ᴄᴏᴍᴍᴜɴɪᴛʏ ᴘᴀɢᴇ ᴡʜᴇʀᴇ ᴀɴʏʙᴏᴅʏ ᴄᴀɴ ᴄᴏᴍᴇ ᴀɴᴅ ᴜᴘʟᴏᴀᴅ ᴛʜᴇɪʀ ᴘʜᴏᴛᴏs ᴀɴᴅ ɪᴍᴀɢᴇs ᴀʟᴏɴɢ ᴡɪᴛʜ ᴀ sʜᴏʀᴛ ᴄᴀᴘᴛɪᴏɴ ᴇxᴘʟᴀɪɴɪɴɢ ᴡʜʏ ᴛʜᴇ ᴘᴇʀsᴏɴ ɪɴ ᴛʜᴇ ᴘʜᴏᴛᴏɢʀᴀᴘʜ ɪs sᴍɪʟɪɴɢ ᴛᴏᴅᴀʏ. 

 ɴɪʀᴜ…🔹🔹

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Indian IT Industry

With US economy doing well, 2018 likely to be much better year for Indian IT industry

Updated: Oct 23, 2017, 06:57 PM IST, PTI

IT industry
With the US economy doing well, Indian IT companies can look forward to a better year in 2018 on the back of growing tech spend and demand from clients, according to senior industry figures.Noting that the largest market for Indian IT companies is the US, former CFO of Infosys V Balakrishnan said their ability to grab growth opportunities is critical.
“(The) US economy is doing extremely well. I think they are still growing 2-2.5%, good growth for that economy,” he told PTI. “If you look at the Gartner report, they talked about overall IT spend going up by 4-4.5% this year. I think there is growth. The ability of the company to take on growth is critical. I think growth opportunities are there,” added Balakrishnan. He said if the world’s largest economy is doing well, Indian IT companies “have a hope”.

“They (the US) are talking about raising interest rates because growth is good, unemployment rate is very low, (US President Donald) Trump is talking about cutting corporate tax, so the economy is doing well. As long as the US economy does well, there will be opportunities for Indian IT companies,” Balakrishnan said. On NASSCOM projecting Indian IT export to grow 7-8% in 2017-18 and domestic market expanding 10-11%, he said “it looks okay for the year”.
“But I think the next year should be good if the US economy continues to do well,” Balakrishnan said. Another ex-CFO of Infosys, T V Mohandas Pai, said he has read many analysts’ reports in the US that indicate that “the work is coming to big system integrators because tasks have become complex”. “I spoke to industry people and they say digital work for all big companies is growing in double digits. Rest of the traditional business is not growing much. Digital is growing very rapidly and for the big fellows digital is 20-25% of business. So, I think there is good growth,” Pai said.
According to Balakrishnan, overall global IT spending is around USD 3.7 trillion every year. “Of that, one-third is IT services; so there is still a lot of spending happening on the legacy side which goes into maintenance and building some core applications. That has not gone away. “The incremental spending is happening in the digital area, and there, companies are building capabilities trying to play to ecosystem and go to the clients. Both are happening. I don’t think the legacy services are totally gone. A large part of it is still there,

Google machine software

Google’s Machine Learning Software Has Learned to Replicate Itself

  • Google’s AutoML
  • Back in May, Google revealed its AutoML project; artificial intelligence (AI) designed to help them create other AIs. Now, Google has announced that AutoML has beaten the human AI engineers at their own game by building machine-learning software that’s more efficient and powerful than the best human-designed systems.
  • An AutoML system recently broke a record for categorizing images by their content, scoring 82 percent. While that’s a relatively simple task, AutoML also beat the human-built system at a more complex task integral to autonomous robots and augmented reality: marking the location of multiple objects in an image. For that task, AutoML scored 43 percent versus the human-built system’s 39 percent.
  • These results are meaningful because even at Google, few people have the requisite expertise to build next generation AI systems. It takes a rarified skill set to automate this area, but once it is achieved, it will change the industry. “Today these are handcrafted by machine learning scientists and literally only a few thousands of scientists around the world can do this,” WIRED reports Google CEO Sundar Pichai said. “We want to enable hundreds of thousands of developers to be able to do it.”
  • Image Credit: Google
  • Much of metalearning is about imitating human neural networks and trying to feed more and more data through those networks. This isn’t — to use an old saw — rocket science. Rather, it’s a lot of plug and chug work that machines are actually well-suited to do once they’ve been trained. The hard part is imitating the brain structure in the first place, and at scales appropriate to take on more complex problems.
  • The Future of Machine-Built AI
  • It’s still easier to adjust an existing system to meet new needs than it is to design a neural network from the ground up. However, this research seems to suggest this is a temporary state of affairs. As it becomes easier for AIs to design new systems with increased complexity, it will be important for humans to play a gatekeeping role. AI systems can easily make biased connections accidentally — such as associating ethnic and gendered identities with negative stereotypes. However, if human engineers are spending less time on the grunt work involved in creating the systems, they’ll have more time to devote to oversight and refinement.
  • Ultimately, Google is aiming to hone AutoML until it can function well enough for programmers to use it for practical applications. If they succeed in this, AutoML is likely to have an impact far beyond the walls of Google. WIRED reports Pichai stated, at the same event from last week, that “We want to democratize this,” — meaning, the company hopes to make AutoML available outside Google.

Dr Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan

September 5 is a special day in the history of India. Dr. Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, a legendary teacher and India’s second President, is remembered on this day. Widely recognised and respected as one of the 20th century’s most respe



cted Indian thinkers, he wasn’t just a teacher.

He was also an accomplished scholar, a distinguished philosopher, a consummate statesman and an effective diplomat.

Born on 5 September 1888 in Tiruttani (a small temple town in Tamil Nadu), Radhakrishnan grew up to become and exemplary teacher who always strove to bring the best out of his students. Such was his clarity and comprehensiveness as a teacher that students of other colleges used to attend his philosophy classes during his years at the Madras Presidency College, the Mysore University and the Calcutta University.

Later, when Radhakrishnan became the second President of India, some of his fans and students met him to request his permission to commemorate his birthday with a celebration. He replied by saying,”instead of celebrating my birthday separately, it would be my proud privilege if September 5 is celebrated as Teachers’ Day.”
Decades later, his legacy continues to play a pivotal role in inspiring teachers across India to contribute to nation-building.
On the occasion of Teacher’s Day, we bring you eight facts that you may not have known about Dr Radhakrishnan.
1. Credited for taking Indian philosophy to the western world, Dr Radhakrishnan’s reason for choosing philosophy for his MA were the free textbooks he got from a cousin!

After completing his school education, Radhakrishnan’s father wanted him to become a priest at a temple rather than study further. However, he worked hard to win a scholarship from the Madras Christian College that enabled him to pursue his BA and graduate with first class honours in 1906.
While he was initially interested in the physical sciences for his masters, he chose Philosophy as he got free textbooks from a cousin who had just graduated in the subject! However, he quickly grew to love the subject and even wrote several books on the subject.
2. When he got a one-of-a-kind farewell from his students in Mysore.
The year was 1921 and Radhakrishnan was attending a farewell ceremony organised for him by the students of Maharaja College, Mysore. When he came out after the ceremony, his students requested him to board a decorated horse cart. Interestingly, the horses were absent from their positions.
Though curious about the cart, Radhakrishnan complied with the students’ wishes. After he sat inside, his students took the places of the horses and pulled the wagon all the way to the Mysore railway station to drop their beloved teacher!
3. The first book he wrote was about the philosophy of Rabindranath Tagore, which he believed to be the true manifestation of Indian spirit.
A rare photograph of the three legends, Sir Maurice Gwyer, Rabindranath Tagore, and Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, coming out from Sinha Sadan
In 1920, Radhakrishnan was invited by the Vice-Chancellor of the Calcutta University to take up the post of Professor of Mental and Moral Science. He accepted and it was during his tenure in Calcutta that he interacted closely with Tagore. Deeply impressed by the Nobel Laureate’s philosophy, he chose to base his first book on it.

Later, he was invited to deliver the Upton lectures at the Manchester College and the Haskell lectures at Chicago. He also served as the Spalding Professor of Eastern Religions in the Oxford University for three years.

During his time abroad, he would frequently use the platform to talk about India’s quest for freedom from colonial rule. After his return to India, he went on to publish some of his finest works that include The Religion We Need, The Heart of Hindustan and The Future Civilisation.September 5 is a special day in the history of India. Dr. Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, a legendary teacher and India’s second President, is remembered on this day. Widely recognised and respected as one of the 20th century’s most respected Indian thinkers, he wasn’t just a teacher.

He was also an accomplished scholar, a distinguished philosopher, a consummate statesman and an effective diplomat.

Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan

Photo Source
Born on 5 September 1888 in Tiruttani (a small temple town in Tamil Nadu), Radhakrishnan grew up to become an exemplary teacher who always strove to bring the best out of his students. Such was his clarity and comprehensiveness as a teacher that students of other colleges used to attend his philosophy classes during his years at the Madras Presidency College, the Mysore University and the Calcutta University.
Later, when Radhakrishnan became the second President of India, some of his fans and students met him to request his permission to commemorate his birthday with a celebration. He replied by saying,”instead of celebrating my birthday separately, it would be my proud privilege if September 5 is celebrated as Teachers’ Day.”
Decades later, his legacy continues to play a pivotal role in inspiring teachers across India to contribute to nation-building.
On the occasion of Teacher’s Day, we bring you eight facts that you may not have known about Dr Radhakrishnan.

1. Credited for taking Indian philosophy to the western world, Dr Radhakrishnan’s reason for choosing philosophy for his MA were the free textbooks he got from a cousin!
After completing his school education, Radhakrishnan’s father wanted him to become a priest at a temple rather than study further. However, he worked hard to win a scholarship from the Madras Christian College that enabled him to pursue his BA and graduate with first class honours in 1906.
While he was initially interested in the physical sciences for his masters, he chose Philosophy as he got free textbooks from a cousin who had just graduated in the subject! However, he quickly grew to love the subject and even wrote several books on the subject.
2. When he got a one-of-a-kind farewell from his students in Mysore.

Photo Source
The year was 1921 and Radhakrishnan was attending a farewell ceremony organised for him by the students of Maharaja College, Mysore. When he came out after the ceremony, his students requested him to board a decorated horse cart. Interestingly, the horses were absent from their positions.
Though curious about the cart, Radhakrishnan complied with the students’ wishes. After he sat inside, his students took the places of the horses and pulled the wagon all the way to the Mysore railway station to drop their beloved teacher!
3. The first book he wrote was about the philosophy of Rabindranath Tagore, which he believed to be the true manifestation of Indian spirit.

A rare photograph of the three legends, Sir Maurice Gwyer, Rabindranath Tagore, and Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, coming out from Sinha Sada

In 1920, Radhakrishnan was invited by the Vice-Chancellor of the Calcutta University to take up the post of Professor of Mental and Moral Science. He accepted and it was during his tenure in Calcutta that he interacted closely with Tagore. Deeply impressed by the Nobel Laureate’s philosophy, he chose to base his first book on it.
Later, he was invited to deliver the Upton lectures at the Manchester College and the Haskell lectures at Chicago. He also served as the Spalding Professor of Eastern Religions in the Oxford University 

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